The idea of miracles is a major obstacle to faith in the modern world essay

What are science and religion, and how do they interrelate? Science and religion is a recognized field of study with dedicated journals e. Journal of Religion and Scienceacademic chairs e. Most of its authors are either theologians e.

The idea of miracles is a major obstacle to faith in the modern world essay

Get Full Essay Get access to this section to get all help you need with your essay and educational issues. Get Access The Idea of Miracles is a Major Obstacle to Faith in the Modern World Essay Sample From the ideas about the nature of creation to ideas about the laws of nature itself, miracles, and the idea of the impossible, have been part of our culture for centuries.

Miracles have been a measure for dispute within religion and between religion and rationality, from St. Augustine in the fourth century to David Hume in the eighteenth century.

Some miracles have been derided as mere magic, and have been proven fraudulent, yet for many the idea of the miraculous has maintained a grip on the imagination.

Miracles are certainly religiously significant, but their meaning varies between faiths. Within Islam, for example, everything happens in order that the will of God can be fulfilled, and therefore nature, history and time are absolutely fluid, constructed by God as a test of the will of God.

In Hinduism, there is a sense of the world being infinitely more wonderful than is first perceived, and sometimes, other layers of reality or possibility are seen. In the Christian faith, the main focus of this essay, miracles play a key role in the story of Jesus. The Bible contains many accounts of miracles performed by Jesus, but that does not mean to say that the miracles were supernatural — some claim that Jesus did not walk on water, but rather on a sandbar just below the surface.

A believer would say that Jesus was the son of God and so possessed the supernatural powers to walk on water and duplicate the bread and fish. The dilemma of many scholars, claims American theologian Robert E.

David Hume would support the notion that we can neither completely disprove or prove that miracles happen. Four reasons persuaded Hume that Miracles are likely fictitious. First, he thought that there has never been a miracle with so much reliable testament to its occurrence that it should be believed.

Lastly Hume made the point that different religions are mutually exclusive so the miracle claims of each with the intention of supporting it, cancel each other out. Swinburne, on the other hand, saw no problem in accepting the occurrence of a miracle, as long as the witness has the ability to interpret the evidence, in the right circumstances, and without proof to the contrary.

He used a cumulative argument, and the principles of credulity and testimony, in his attempt to establish an initial credibility of miracle claims. A favorite explanation for the dramatic parting of the red sea, which has formed a major focus for Jewish and Israelite self-understanding, is that it was the result of a huge volcanic explosion on an Island called San Terini, near Crete.

For example, there is a parable where Jesus is in a boat with his disciples on the sea of Galilee, when a huge storm begins to swirl and creates towering waves.

Jesus says a word and everything is calm, and this is meant to show that in Jesus there is the capacity to inhabit the power of the creator God. Perhaps it is these symbolic truisms and signs in miracles which are necessary to Christianity, not just the literal belief in its occurrence. It seems that attempts at rationalizing miracles in the Judeo-Christian tradition have been largely fruitless to the believers, as ordinary miracles of love, care and compassion are just as impressive as dramatic nature-defying ones.

If a believer accepts that miracles in the Bible happened as is written, he might have to ask himself why miracles are so random, and why God is selective about when and for whom to intervene.

Questions such as these can present difficulties in reconciling a belief in miracles with belief in the omnibenevolent and omnipotent Judeo-Christian God. Wiles, wanting to hold on to the goodness of God, said that we should see the whole of creation as the great miraculous act of God, and not just meaningless coincidences.

Ward is able to reconcile his belief in God with random intervention by saying if God acted in every situation, his creation would be disrupted. The Augustinian and Irenean theodicies could also be used to defend the morality of God, perhaps saying that we need to encounter difficulties to step in to the likeness of God.

This, it would seem, presents us with a solution to the moral objection of miracles, and thus removes a major reason for miracles to be an obstacle to faith. For example, if God is considered a personal being then interaction with the world seems infinitely more possible, and if we consider, like Wiles, that the whole of creation is the miracle, or that miracles do not have to breach the understanding of science, then much of the obstacle is removed.

Locke, John | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

One does not have to be a fundamentalist evangelical to agree with Paul here, and it is hugely important to many believers who are traditional theists whether miracles could or could not occur, and if one could justify a belief that they did occur.

However, they are not exempt from the criticism of science. In Christian theology, perhaps because of pressure put on their faith by naturalistic speculation, there has been a movement to demythologize the New Testament. John Macquarrie said the problem with miracles is they are so subjective, and so we should treat the stories in the New Testament as being myth.

Perhaps, therefore, miracles in the Bible and other literature do not have to be taken as fact, but should be accepted for what they are, vehicles for the change of life. Moreover, many modern believers are inclined to think this way because so many skeptics view belief in miracles as primitive fantasy, a relic of the age of magic, a vestige of polytheism.

The conflict between science and religion over the issue of miracles is unending.'Miracle stories are an obstacle to faith for modern people.' Discuss. watch. 'Miracles stories are an obstacle to faith for modern people'. Discuss. We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun.

The long term effects of both the Scientific Revolution and the modern acceptance and dependence upon science can be felt today in our daily lives. And notwithstanding some major calamity -- science and the scientific spirit will be around for centuries to come.

science is an idea. And this idea -- science -- gives us ways in which to think. John Locke (—) John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and political theorists of the 17 th century. He is often regarded as the founder of a school of thought known as British Empiricism, and he made foundational contributions to modern theories of limited, liberal government.

The Idea of Miracles is a Major Obstacle to Faith in the Modern World Essay Sample. From the ideas about the nature of creation to ideas about the laws of nature itself, miracles, and the idea of the impossible, have been part of our culture for centuries.

I Believe in Miracles. Claira - Ashburn, Virginia.

The idea of miracles is a major obstacle to faith in the modern world essay

Entered on June 21, Age Group: 18 - I had no idea what was going to happen, I was scared to death. And then I expected the worst- what if my little sister died? Thankfully, the ambulance came in about two minutes and she was off to the hospital. If you enjoyed this essay. "The idea of miracles is a major obstacle to faith in the modern world" - discuss From the ideas about the nature of creation to ideas about the laws of nature itself, miracles, and the idea of the impossible, have been part of our culture for centuries.

Newman Reader - Essays on Miracles